Sunday, November 17, 2013

Happy Thanksgivukkah

Although Chanukah is always on the same day in the Hebrew calendar--the 25th of Kislev--it does come very early this year in the secular calendar.  In fact, it begins the night before Thanksgiving, which is why this year many families will be serving latkes along side the sweet potatoes and turkey while celebratingThanksgivukkah. 

Anyway, let's move forward with Chanukah projects.  Here's a fun idea that makes a great gift:
Chanukah-in-a-Jar
Hanukkah Gifts

There are many variations on recipes in a jar for delicious cookies, soups, natural scrubs, and more. In fact, I've even altered empty tennis ball cans for brownies-in-a-tennis-ball-can recipes.

For this project, I use a clear plastic pail that is 6" tall with a 4" diameter. It has a lid as well as a handle, which lends itself nicely for attaching ribbons and tags.


Gather craft supplies for embellishing the container including printed and solid scrapbook, glitter and gift wrapping paper, ribbon, punches, stamps, ink, tags, charms, metal labels, etc.


Grab some chocolate gelt, a wooden dreidel, matches and any other Chanukah items you choose.
Chanukah decor


Cut a strip of cardstock 2" x 18". [If using 12" x 12" paper, cut two pieces and tape them together.] Then cut a coordinating piece of your gift wrap or printed paper 1-1/2" x 18."   Using a dry adhesive, tape these two long pieces together. 

Using a 2-1/2" circle punch, cut a circle out of glittery paper. Punch out two smaller circles (I used a scalloped punch, too) from the solid cardstock. Stamp image on smaller circle.

Adhere long strips to pail. Also adhere ribbon to the center of the paper strip, finishing at the same seam as the paper.  Adhere the circles to the pail, covering up the seams.
Chanukah stamps

Cover the inset of the lid with paper with mod podge. When dry, adhere "Chanukah-in-a-Jar" label [which I printed on cardstock] and metal label holder to lid. Using varied textures and widths, cut 6" strands of coordinating ribbon to pail handle.  Tie charm to metal holder.

Happy Hanukkah

Stamp "Happy Hanukkah" and "To/From" images to tags.


Measure and cut paper to size of top of dreidel.  Punch a small hole in center of the paper square, which will fit over the dreidel stem. Decoupage.

playing dreidel

Then choose the "ingredients" for your jar. I suggest an entire box of 44 menorah candles (enough candles for each night), the large dreidel, matchbox, chocolate gelt and candle blessings.

For the blessings, I printed the Hebrew, transliteration and translation on both sides of a 4" x 6" cardstock, rolled it up and tied it with blue & white twine.
Chanukah gelt

The match box is embellished with cardstock and a stamped image that reads "Happy Hanukkah."
Decorating matches for Hanukkah

Carefully place the candles and other "ingredients" inside the pail. 
That's it!
Here is the completed Chanukah-in-a-Jar:
Handmade Hanukkah Gift
Pin It

If you would like a copy of the blessings document, leave a comment with your email, and I will be glad to send it to you.

Happy Thanksgivukkah everyone!

For additional Chanukah ideas:

Hanukkah coaster and tray decor



Meet me at these parties and these new ones:
Fluster Buster
House on the Way




Monday, November 11, 2013

"Giving Thanks" Journal


                Thanksgiving Journal
Pin It

Today I'm sharing an altered art project just in time for Thanksgiving, a "Giving Thanks" Journal. 

                            Thanks.
                            Hopes.
                            Actions.
                            Noteworthiness.
                            Kindness.
                            Sincerity.

                            Giving Journal.
Giving Thanks Journal 
Giving Thanks.  Thanksgiving.  Any way you say it, it's important to recognize and appreciate everyone and everything you have to be thankful for:  your loving family, best friends, your cuddly little puppy dog, your favorite teacher.  You get the idea.

A great way to remind yourself about all the wonderful people and things going on in your life is to create a "Giving Thanks" Journal. 

First, gather your supplies.  Select your paper, and then go through your craft stash, choosing embellishments you may want to use in altering your journal including ribbon, buttons, brads, metal findings, flowers, tags, chipboard, etc.  

Next, measure the front of your notebook, and cut the paper to size. 

Since my notebook has a spiral edge, I used a spiral punch down one side of the paper and carefully decoupaged it onto the notebook cover, gently sliding the paper underneath the spirals.  You will get a better seal if you apply decoupage to both surfaces.  In this case, I coated the front of the journal as well as the back of the paper.

After a few minutes, you can then decoupage the top of the paper.  This will help the surface resist wear and tear.
 

Now comes my favorite step:  Embellishments! 

I am a self-appointed ribbon queen.  I just love how ribbon adds so much color and texture to a project.  I cut 7" lengths of eight different ribbons, and tied them around the spirals. 
Creative Journal

I added a metal frame and coordinating cardstock. I typed out "GIVING THANKS JOURNAL" using my label maker (which I have owned since the 1960's!), and centered the labels inside the metal frame.

Then I punched out six divider tabs and glued them to the journal pages, creating six sections.

I added the words, 
Thanks, Hopes, Actions, Noteworthiness, Kindness and Sincerity.  
When you put the first letters of each word together, it spells THANKS.

This journal has a pocket on the inside front page which I embellished with paper, ribbon and a metal heart paperclip.  I tied ribbons through manila tags, which will be used as bookmarks).  If your journal does not have a pocket, you can add one to the inside back cover.

A few more embellishments including extra ribbon, sunflowers and brads complete the journal.

This would be a great time to start a new tradition in your family.  Pass around the journal at the Thanksgiving table, and ask everyone to jot down who and what they are thankful for, their hopes, their actions, etc.   Bring it out every year and add to it, read the previous year's notes, and continue adding to it year after year.

Wouldn't this be a great journal to pass down to future generations?  
Thanksgiving Journal
Pin It

I hope this altered "Giving Thanks" Journal inspires you to add something special to your Thanksgiving traditions.


And here's a quick and easy Thanksgiving project:

Put your party hat on at:

My Uncommon Slice of Suburbia

Related Posts Plugin for WordPress, Blogger...